$9.95 Flat Rate Shipping USA

hi visibility clothing

  • Boy Did That Go Fast!

    Boy did that go by fast. Did anybody get a chance to visit with summer? I invited summer to come and stay with us for a while. It was a pretty nice offer, but she seemed to have a better offer and is already packed up and gone. Fall has now arrived, but assured me that she could only stay a little while and I should get prepared for the inevitable. Up here in Wisconsin the ice fishermen are already checking out their gear including ice shelters, boots, mittens, tip ups and jig poles. These guys are out shopping for the latest gear to keep warm, but first have to get past the Halloween décor, which is quickly being replaced by Christmas trees. Are you kidding me? As soon as the ice is dangerously thin, some of them will start to venture out, and invariably fall through wishing they’d waited a little longer.

    I’m already getting calls for winter PPE. This makes sense. After last winter it seems nobody wants to get caught without something to keep them warm, besides a fire and a cup of hot chocolate. Now is the time to make sure you’re prepared. Are you working outside in the logging industry, public agencies, construction, are you a School Bus Driver, or employed in an industry that would require you to work outside or in extreme cold temps ? Even if you are working in an unheated or minimally heated warehouse, then please consider Hi-Vis clothing Hi Visibility Winter Jacketfor cold temps.

    The following data is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

    • Data for 2011 are preliminary.

    From 1999 to 2011, a total of 16,911 deaths in the United States, an average of 1,301 per year, were associated with exposure to excessive natural cold. The highest yearly total of hypothermia-related deaths (1,536) was in 2010 and the lowest (1,058) in 2006. Approximately 67% of hypothermia-related deaths were among males.

    Here is another frightening statistic from the department of health: Figures released by the Department of Health show that 28,354 episodes of hypothermia were treated in 2012/13 – an increase of 25% on the year before and 40% on the year before that. Many of these relate to the over-70s and babies, who are more susceptible to the cold.

    As a safety advocate, parent, grandparent, and outdoor enthusiast, I would highly recommend you learn and recognize the signs of hypothermia, and how to treat it. There are several sources for this. I’ve chosen WebMD for a concise list. If you need training, check out your local Red Cross or see your Health and Safety Director where you work, to see if there is an opportunity for participating. If not, encourage them to sponsor a training. Please don’t learn the hard way, and if you must test out the ice make sure it’s in your choice of beverages. I Like root beer.

    From everyone at SafetyInstruction.com, make it a safe day!

    Interested in a complete learning management system for the safety of your employees? Sign up for a walkthrough of our LMS and we’ll show you how your employees can get the best learner experience at a price you can afford!

  • I Can't Believe I Didn't See Him

    I’m sure all of us have muttered those words at least once in our lives. Sometimes we were more surprised and startled by the discovery than our potential victims. At times it can be quite comical, but conversely there are times when it can lead to an injury or worse it can be fatal.

    I often see walkers and bike riders wearing what appears to be industrial or public agency3m-reflective-mesh-vest high visibility safety vests, or tees. OK, so it’s not very fashionable, but what a great idea! My wife and I are both walkers and cyclers, and are taking the plunge into the fashion world of Hi-Vis safety.

    So how do we as safety advocates know when it’s appropriate to advise on the use of or type of Hi-Vis clothing? The ANSI/SEA 107-2010 Standard is the place to find your answers. According to ISEA (International Safety Equipment Association) "High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Headwear is an industry consensus standard that specifies requirements for apparel and headwear that is capable of visually signaling the user's presence.” The standard also specifies the types, classes and colors of high-visibility safety garments required based on wearer’s activities and nearby vehicle and equipment speeds. For more information regarding the regulation please visit their website.

    Garments are the same. There are performance classes either 1,2, or 3 and they are defined by the total area of visible background and retro reflective material. These classes are directly proportional to the environment and hazard the wearer is going to be exposed to. So, a hazard analysis should be performed by a competent person as defined by OSHA, and in accordance with the “General Duty Clause”. The higher the class number, the greater the hazard or risk associated with the garment worn.

    For example:

    Class 3, the highest risk, your worker needs to be visible through a full range of body motions from a minimum distance of 1280 feet. These workers include EMTs, utility works, flaggers, etc.

    Class 2 Hi-Vis Safety Garments are worn by those workers exposed to traffic moving in excess of 25mph, or if the environmental background is more diverse. These workers include roadway construction, crossing guards, first responders and utility crews.

    While a Class 1 garment is for use where equipment speeds do not exceed 25mph like parking lot attendants, or warehouse ops.

    As for myself and my wife I think we’ll opt for class 2. Now if we can just get the designer version. Make sure to check out our assortment of Safety Gear and from everyone at SafetyInstruction.com, make it a Safe Day!

2 Item(s)