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Hearing Conservation

  • Spring Safety Starts with the First Seed Catalog

    We’ve been focusing on everything winter, but in the next four weeks well OK maybe in the next four weeks we can take out our “Spring” jackets, or think about an Easter Bonnet. My wife sent the family a text message the other users manualday expressing “Hope” as I had received my seed catalog in the mail. Winter up here has not been kind, not all my perennials and shrubs are going to make it. I’m now interviewing for replacements and dog earring the pages in the catalog of those who might make the cut. Along with this of course I’m reminded that my garden tiller and other yard equipment are in my shed across what seems to be the frozen tundra. They’ll need some TLC before the season gets started. Now is the perfect time, not just to fix what’s broke, but to read the manuals, and brush up on safe operation as well.

    The Manual will usually start out by stating: DANGER: To reduce the potential for accidents, comply with the safety instructions in this manual, failure to comply may result in serious personal injury, and / or equipment and property damage.

    “Mantis” which is the type of tiller I own further states in their manual, and goes on to warn that: “Improper use or care of this tiller or failure to wear proper protection can result in serious injury. Read and understand the rules for safe operation and all instructions in this manual. – Wear hearing, and eye protection, and I might personally add, appropriate footwear. If the tiller is used improperly or safety precautions are not followed, the users risk serious injuries to themselves and others. Read and understand this manual before attempting to operate this tiller”.

    This sounds pretty straight forward and to the point. Yet I would guess (and it’s just a guess) that 75% of new equipment owners will not read this part of the manual. I realize that for the most part manufacturers are protecting themselves from lawsuits by those who would see fit to ignore common sense. And besides it’s a requirement. Here at Safetyinstruction.com we do care, and provide safety instructional material to accommodate safety plans and programs. While we’re thinking about it this is a pretty good time to also look at outdated pesticides, and weed killers you might be storing from last summer. Dispose of them in the proper manner. Check with your local landfill or municipality for “safe places” places to dispose of them. Safety as we know it is about common sense, but sometimes we all need reminders.

  • Hearing Conservation: A Story from Someone Who Should Know Better

    Last year I wrote this blog about Hearing conservation. This article updates the experience.

    I’m a deer hunter from Wisconsin and hunt with my four sons and two grandsons. During the week I work with Safety professionals helping them find solutions to safety issues confronting them. This particular story is defined by this number 29CFR 1910.95. This is OSHA’s regulation for “Occupational Noise Exposure”

    The “Hearing Health Foundation” reports that 1 in 5 Americans have hearing loss in at least 1 ear. That’s 48 million people. They also report that 20% of the US population 12 years and older has hearing difficulties severe enough to impact communication. One more statistic; 26 million Americans between 20 and 69 have hearing loss due to exposure to loud noises at work or in leisure activities.

    So I should know these things. Last fall three weeks before the Wisconsin Gun deer season opened up. We were making our annual trip to the woods to “Sight in” our weapons of choice. My #3 son and his son were going to sight in a brand new 30.06 rifle and scope. The other boys also have nice rifles. Me, I still hunt with my 12 ga. Shotgun, which I’ve used for over 40 years. Once we arrived of course, the bragging started. Soon the targets were set up, wagers were made, and we were ready to go. Gun safety has always been a part of our routine, and this time was no different, well except for one detail. “Hearing Protection” The boys all had ear plugs or muffs, but Dad (that’s me) in his infinite wisdom sat right down and before you know it I can’t hear a thing except the ringing in my ears. Well one ear recovered fairly well, but the other ear, after seven months is, I‘m afraid permanently damaged. I need to make an appointment with an Audiologist.

    My sons finally convinced me, well my wife and daughter also had something to do with it. I made the appointment with a professional audiologist after my annual physical. The doctor recommended a good one after he confirmed what I already knew. Truth is they were both damaged. I had no idea of what technology had to offer in the way of hearing aids. The audiologist was respectful and recognized the fact that today if you need to have a hearing aid you want them to be discreet, match your lifestyle and your budget. Today I’m wearing a new set of ears and thankful for new technology.

    A gunshot has a decibel level of up to 150db. A decibel is how noise is measured. Noise Levels above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss. This does not include the sudden percussion making exposure to damage more likely especially in a more confined area where sound waves can’t escape. Do you have teenagers with a major audio system in their ride? Do they say “What?” a lot? . So now I’m a statistic

    My advice. Make sure you take your safety training home with you when you leave work, and share it with the ones you love, and don’t wait to fix what’s broken.

    Let the experts at SafetyInstruction.com save your money and your hearing by providing you with the proper training materials for hearing conservation!

    Visit www.safetyinstruction.com today to view our complete training library allowing you to create a safety culture for years to come!

  • A Brand New Rifle and a Brand New Hearing Problem

    Hearing Loss: A story from someone who should know better

    I’m a deer hunter from Wisconsin and hunt with my four sons and a grandson. During the week I work with Safety professionals helping them find solutions to safety issues confronting them. This particular story is defined by this number 29CFR 1910.95. This is OSHA’s regulation for “Occupational Noise Exposure”.

    The “Hearing Health Foundation” reports that 1 in 5 Americans have hearing loss in at least 1 ear. That’s 48 million people. They also report that 20% of the US population 12 years and older has hearing difficulties severe enough to impact communication. One more statistic; 26 million Americans between 20 and 69 have hearing loss due to exposure to loud noises at work or in leisure activities.

    So I should know these things. Last fall three weeks before the Wisconsin Gun deer season opened up. We were making our annual trip to the woods to “Sight in” our weapons of choice. My #3 son and his son were going to sight in a brand new 30.06 rifle and scope. The other boys also have nice rifles. Me, I still hunt with my 12 ga. Shotgun, which I’ve used for over 40 years. Once we arrived of course, the bragging started. Soon the targets were set up, wagers were made, and we were ready to go. Gun safety has always been a part of our routine, and this time was no different, well except for one detail. “Hearing Protection” The boys all had ear plugs or muffs, but Dad (that’s me) in his infinite wisdom sat right down and before you know it I can’t hear a thing except the ringing in my ears. Well one ear recovered fairly well, but the other ear, after seven months is, I‘m afraid permanently damaged. I need to make an appointment with an Audiologist.

    A gunshot has a decibel level of up to 150db. A decibel is how noise is measured. Noise Levels above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss. This does not include the sudden percussion making exposure to damage more likely especially in a more confined area where sound waves can’t escape. Do you have teenagers with a major audio system in their ride? Do they say “What?” a lot? . So now I’m a statistic.

    My advice. Make sure you take your safety training home with you when you leave work, and share it with the ones you love.

  • Safety Spotlight: Noise Hazards in Sports Venues

    The sports industry is one of the industries that receive less discussions when it comes to workers’ safety and health issues. It may be because of intentional negligence or ignorance of the hazards sports arenas have. Either way, the industry’s workforce is still at risk. Laura Walter of EHS Today discusses two new studies that focused on noise hazards in sporting venues. Read more on “There’s No Sport in Exposing Workers to Noise Hazards.”

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